Office Based Tests

Ankle Brachial Index (ABI)

An ABI is a test to evaluate the health of the leg arteries and check for any significant blockages. A series of blood pressures will be taken in both arms and feet using an ultrasound probe to evaluate for any significant leg artery blockages. The test takes approximately 30 minutes to complete and is done in a lying position.

Visit the American Heart Association web page for more details.

Carotid Ultrasound

A carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the neck arteries which supply blood flow to the brain. The pictures can help identify a blockage or narrowing of the arteries that can increase the risk of stroke.

Visit the Mayo Clinic web page for more details.

Echocardiogram

An echocardiogram is an ultrasound of the heart that helps evaluate the structure and function of the heart valves and chambers. You will be asked to lie down on an examination table and the sonographer will place the ultrasound transducer (hand held wand) at different areas on the chest. Multiple pictures will be taken.

Visit the American Heart Association web page for more details.

Electrocardiogram

An electrocardiogram. (EKG or ECG) is a test to check the electrical activity of your heart. Each beat of the heart is triggered by an electrical impulse. An EKG records these electrical signals as they travel through the heart. It is a non-invasive, painless test.

Visit the American Heart Association web page for more details.

Lower Extremity Arterial Ultrasound

A lower extremity arterial ultrasound is a diagnostic test to determine if there are any significant blockages in the leg arteries. An ultrasound transducer (hand held wand) will evaluate the major arteries in the legs to determine the health of the arteries and identify any significant areas of stenosis or blockage.

Lower Extremity Vein Ultrasound

A vein ultrasound is used to determine the health of the valves in the leg veins that open and close to assist the return of blood flow back to the heart. Venous insufficiency or reflux is the result of damaged or diseased valves that do not close property leading to symptoms such as varicose veins, pain, swollen limbs, leg heaviness, skin changes and ulcers. The test is done in a standing position.

Regular Treadmill Stress Test

During a regular treadmill stress test, you are connected to an EKG machine while you exercise on a treadmill. During this time, we monitor your heart rate, blood pressure and EKG tracings. Abnormalities on this test may indicate possible blockages in one of more of the coronary (heart) arteries or the presence of an abnormal heart rhythm.

Preparing for a Regular Treadmill Stress Test 

Visit the American Heart Association web page for more details.

Exercise Nuclear Stress Test

A nuclear stress test is similar to a routine exercise stress test except it provides pictures of your heart in addition to EKG tracings. When you first arrive, our nuclear technician will place an IV in your arm and inject a radioactive substance into your bloodstream.

Then you will lie down on a special table under a camera that can detect the radioactive material and create images of your heart. The next step of the test is where you exercise on a treadmill.

During this time, we will monitor your heart rate, blood pressure and heart rhythm. When you reach your maximum heart rate, we inject an additional amount of the radioactive imaging agent. Immediately following the exercise portion of the test, you will again lie down on the table where we will take more pictures of your heart. Abnormalities on this test may indicate possible blockages in one of more of the coronary (heart) arteries or the presence of an abnormal heart rhythm.

Preparing for an Exercise Nuclear Stress Test 

Pharmacologic (Lexiscan) Nuclear Stress Test

Lexiscan is a prescription medication used in a cardiac nuclear stress test. It works by increasing blood flow in the coronary arteries. Lexiscan is given by IV in preparation for a myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) test. This uses a special camera to take pictures of your heart, giving your doctor detailed information about blood flow into your heart.

Preparing for a Pharmacologic (Lexiscan) Nuclear Stress Test  

Visit the American Heart Association web page for more details.

Exercise Stress Echocardiogram

An exercise stress echocardiogram compares ultrasound pictures of the heart taken before and after exercising on a treadmill. This ultrasound uses sound waves to form images of your heart muscle and valves. After baseline pictures have been taken, you will be asked to exercise on a treadmill while your heart rate, blood pressure and EKG tracings are being monitored. When you have reached your peak heart rate, we will have you lie down on a table where we will take additional pictures of your heart. Abnormalities on this test may indicate possible blockages in one of more of the coronary (heart) arteries or the presence of an abnormal heart rhythm.

Preparing for an Exercise Stress Echocardiogram